Minick Law, P.C. https://www.minicklaw.com NC DWI Lawyers | NC DWI Center Wed, 21 Oct 2020 13:50:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 NC DWI Guy Episode 27: Playing with a Lead https://www.minicklaw.com/nc-dwi-guy-episode-27-playing-with-a-lead/ Wed, 21 Oct 2020 13:50:49 +0000 https://www.minicklaw.com/?p=213097 Football announcers talk about the value of playing with a lead vs the disadvantage of playing from behind. The same holds true in business and in life.

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In football, the announcers always talk about the value of playing with a lead and the disadvantage of playing from behind. The same holds true in business and in life. In this episode we dive deep into why playing with a lead is so important to your practice and discuss some practical ways for you to implement this into your firm.

Highlights:

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Why waking up at 5:00 a.m. (or finding that undistracted work time) is key to playing with a lead

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Learn practical tips on how to plan ahead in regards to your court calendar and your case management

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Make sense of this math: 1 client today = 10 clients down the road

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Learn why it is important to be the first to try new marketing opportunities and stay constantly on the forefront of legal marketing

Transcript:

Rise and shine, fellow freedom fighters. Rise and shine. Hear that alarm. Listen to it. That is a terrible sound, isn’t it?

But it is the sound of mentally getting up early. Getting up and getting the day started off the right way. One of my goals for quarter number four is hitting a 5:00 AM wake up time on the weekdays.

And we’re going to talk today about the importance of playing from ahead.

But I was thinking to myself about why getting up at 5:00 AM is important. As I talked about in my quarter four goals podcast last week, if a goal is not important to you, if it doesn’t have a purpose or meaning to you, you’re not going to do it. It’s got to be something that you are personally committed to because of the fact that it is important, that it’s going to change your life, it’s going to give you a better existence, a better life. I was thinking through why is getting up early important. And the reason why is that when I get up early, I get to play from ahead.

Now, what does that mean? Well, I got a crazy life. I’ve got an awesome, awesome job, got great people here at the office, great clients, I’ve got a great family, but from the moment that my first kid wakes up in the morning until I go home at 5:00, time is divided by other people. Other people are controlling my clock, whether that is an appointment on my calendar, a court date, a judge being in control of my time in the courtroom, a DA being in control of my time, clients being in control of my time. Other employees, attorneys at the office needing to ask questions, get clarification on things. My wife called me with questions about things that need to get handled on the home front, one of my kids asking a question, it is non-stop control and other people’s time. So the 5:00 AM wake up allows me to be in control. Me to be in control of what it is that I’m trying to accomplish at that particular moment.

Again, there are ways to minimize that time management problem in other areas. You have to actually figure out ways to carve out time in your practice, to work on the things that you want to work on so that it’s not always other people that are controlling your time.

But the key to my being able to control that time is that 5:00 AM wake up. If I can get up at 5:00, then I have at least an hour and a half to get some things done that I want to get done, whether that is exercising, which often that’s part of that 5:00 AM routine, whether that is prayer time, whether that is spiritual reading, leadership marketing, development reading, whether it is something that I am working on and writing, there is time that I am able to control without distraction what it is that I’m trying to do. And there’s a need, again, to carve that time out during your work.

So whatever your kind of 5:00 AM time looks like, your undistracted time looks like, you have to preserve that. And that’s why to me that wake up time being what it is, is so critical, because it’s that undistracted opportunity to focus in on the things that I need to do in order to succeed as a person, first and foremost, as a Christian, as a father, as a husband. If I don’t put the right stuff in mentally and physically, then I’m not going to be able to be who I need to be for the people that I’m trying to help, support, take care of, and lead. So, it’s important to find that undistracted time, whether that’s 5:00 AM, or 10 o’clock at night, anywhere in between. On the weekend, on vacation, whatever it might be, you’ve got to find that undistracted time that is regularly worked in because that’s what allows you to play from ahead.

Now, I’ve said that a couple of times, but just logistically think through what playing from ahead looks like. So, in a football game, you always hear the announcers, when a team is up one touchdown, two touchdowns, talk about the advantage of playing from ahead.

What is the team that is up by a touchdown or two touchdowns or even more than that doing? They are playing that advantage. They are running out the clock. They have clock management on their side. They are in control of the game flow.

The team that is losing, that is playing from behind, the team that is down, other people are in control of how they have to play. They don’t want that clock going down, but they a lot of times can’t do anything to stop it. They got to sit on the sideline and wait for the next play to get called.

On defense, they’re just waiting for that next play. They can’t speed up the process by which the winning team snaps the football, they’ve got to wait until the play clock gets almost down to zero and then they get to react to what the offense is doing. They have no control over clock management on defense.

On offense, when you’re playing from behind, your playbook is limited. It becomes shrinking. And as you get closer and closer to the end of the game, it becomes very small what the offense can do on any given play because they gotta score.

The winning team doesn’t have to score. The winning team just has to not allow the other team to score more points than they do for the rest of the game. That’s it. But the losing team, they got to make up. They’ve got to work harder to get to a point where they can achieve the victory.

That is the value of playing from ahead. That’s the value of playing from ahead. You get to be in control of the game. Taking that mindset from football of playing from ahead, and it’s true in other sports, playing from ahead is a huge advantage, in basketball, in soccer.

What are those teams trying to do? They’re trying to possess the ball. That’s all they’re trying to do for the rest of the game. Once they get far enough ahead, the goal is just to play keep away. Don’t let the other team have the ball because you’re already winning. So as long as they have the ball, they can’t score, but there’s no pressure on you to put the ball in the net.

So how do we take that advantage of playing from ahead and put it into practice in our businesses, in our lives? Well, waking up early, that is one way to play from ahead. How can we do it in our law firms?

Couple of different thoughts that I have, just a couple of things that I was thinking, how can this plays into practice. First is, the court calendar. In district court practice, we are constantly at the beck and call of the court calendar, of the judge that’s sitting on the bench, of the DA that’s in the courtroom. So taking this mindset into calendaring, you have to be as proactive as your district, as your county allows, in being proactive about your calendars.

When I first started practicing, I had all the time in the world. So anytime I had one case on the calendar, I would go over, sit in court and wait for my case to be called. As things got bigger, as the practice grew, that became more and more difficult, and I realized that I could spend the same amount of time in court handling four cases as I could handling one case. Same amount of time.

So I’m earning more money on the dates that I’m going in handling four cases than on the date that I’m handling only one case, because now that’s just one trip back and forth to court. I’m dividing my time that I’m sitting in court that day between four cases as opposed to being three hours of sitting there waiting for one case to be called. So you have to be proactive about scheduling your cases.

If you’re in a district that will allow you to reset cases and put three or four cases on the same day, or mark three or four things for plea, or continue cases that are not going to get resolved so that you don’t have to show up in the courtroom and make an appearance only to punt down the road and your client doesn’t have to spend time sitting in the courtroom only waiting for a continuance, be proactive about that, because that will allow you to play from ahead.

One of my goals for this year 2020, at the beginning of the year, back into December of last year and then into January of 2020, was to try to spend only 10 days in court a month. I have a lot of cases. I have a pretty good size client caseload that I handle, but I got very aggressive about putting stuff onto the same day, having multiple cases on the same day.

If a case isn’t ready for trial, continuing it out ahead of time so I don’t have to appear on that date to handle the continuance. And every month so far this year, COVID helped us out a little bit in March, April, May, but every month this year, I’ve been able to keep the days that I spend in court to right at 10 days a month. I think there might’ve been one or two months that I had 11 or 12 days in court, that’s 11 or 12 business days, but most days, most months, it was 10 days or less in the courtroom.

And what does that allow me to do? Well, it allows me to work on my practice at the office. It allows me to engage with my clients more often on the phone and be proactive in terms of communicating with them. It allows me to help manage and lead my team, because I’m not again, stuck in the courthouse all the time.

That is reaping the benefits of playing from ahead on the court calendaring side of things. And in all honesty, at first, I thought I was going to be rubbing the court staff the wrong way, rubbing the DAs the wrong way, in terms of moving things around, they prefer it. They prefer to knock a couple of things out at the same time. If a case isn’t going to get handled, then why is the clerk pulling that shock from the clerk’s office and then sending it down on the trolley to the courtroom, and then it having to sit in a DA’s desk and the DA having to call it.

I’m saving the clerk’s office and the DA’s office hours of time a month on cases that were not going to be resolved in the courtroom anyways because they weren’t ready to go, by being proactive and pushing them out. So there is an appreciation on that side of things, that if you can get the buy-in on that front and explain it in those terms, how much time and energy and thought process will be saved, you’re going to be able to hopefully convince the DAs in your district, clerks in your district, judges in your district, that this is a win for everybody. It’s a win for everybody. You’re saving your client’s time, you’re saving the clerk’s time, the judge’s time, the DA’s time, your own time. That’s an all around win.

The court now has time in the courtroom to spend on cases that hopefully involve other attorneys, other defendants, and can actually have something occur with them, as opposed to wasting time continuing your case or dealing with a case that’s not ready to go on your end for whatever reason.

That’s playing from ahead in the courtroom. That same mindset of playing from ahead, and the win of that, the victory of that, is the extra time that I have at the office, the extra time that I have in my personal life, to focus on the things that I need to focus on, to improve my practice, to improve my service to clients, to improve my communication with my clients, to improve my time with my team. So be proactive about that. Play ahead when it comes to court calendaring.

Another place where playing from ahead I’ve seen the advantage of is in marketing and in business. When opportunities come along in the business realm, you got to jump on those and you got to take advantage of that. All kinds of different marketing opportunities are opening up all the time. If you were first to Google AdWords, when Google AdWords first rolled around, then you were paying pennies for something because nobody else rushed in, now, where that market is saturated, way more expensive.

If you were first Avvo advertising, same thing. If you were first to Avvo, you’re paying pennies for your advertisements now as they’re doing a good job, marketing to firms, marketing to attorneys and bringing other people in, the competition goes up, those ads increase in terms of the spend on that. Being there first makes a difference. Playing from ahead makes a difference. And you’re putting your firm out there at the beginning.

Google My Business. If you created a Google My Business account, five years ago, 10 years ago, when this first started coming out, you may be miles ahead of other firms that are in the same area, the same practice area, same location, because of the fact that you jumped on this new opportunity. You went for it in that marketing space.

Facebook advertising, same thing as with Google and Avvo. If you were first to Facebook, it’s cheap. As other competitors come in, both within the legal industry but more importantly from every other business in the world, Facebook ads are going to continue to go up, but they’re going to continue to get more costly.

So you have to constantly be thinking about what can I do different? How can I create a blue ocean? How can I create a space where I am not competing with other people? That is the advantage of waking up early in the marketing realm. What is waking up early in the marketing realm? Jumping on that new opportunity and seeing where it goes.

It may fail, it may be complete dud, but you got to have that mindset of, if it works and I’m the first person there, then I’m going to dominate that space from the outset. And now, I’m going to be able to play from ahead because I’m dominating that space. It’s a mindset process when it comes to marketing.

Another area where you can play from ahead is with your actual client cases. When a client calls you on the phone and you have that initial consultation, you have an opportunity to get out in front of that case. You have the client’s undivided attention because they’re really worried about this situation that they’ve called you, that’s why they’re on the phone with you, because they’re interested in talking to you. You have their full attention and you can walk them through the steps, at that moment, of what success is going to look like, what the next best step is going to look like.

If you basically talk to them in that initial call and you say, “Here’s what my fee is going to be to work on your case. Call me when you have the money,” click. That is a wasted opportunity. It’s wasted. While you have their full attention, tell them what their next best step is going to be, talk to them about what they need to do to right the ship in their life are. They’re listening to you. Set out the game plan, set out the action plan on how they can succeed. Talk them through that, then send a written follow up to them with the steps that they need to take.

On a DWI case, if you don’t do that, that’s why the first, second, third court date need to get continued because the client is repeatedly saying, “Well, you didn’t ever told me that I need to get an alcohol assessment. You never told me that it was going to be this much money to pay in court costs. I’m not ready for that. You never told me it was going to be that. You never told me it was going to be that.”

If you tell them in the initial consultation, you are giving them maximum time to plan and prepare for the consequences and to be ready to go when court rolls around, maybe even to move the court date up in time. That’s the advantage of playing from ahead on the court case, the individual case that you handle.

So what does that do? What does that do? Well, first of all, it allows the client to be more prepared, which is, from an anxiety standpoint, extremely important. But it also allows you to then be able to start thinking of other ways that you can handle the case faster, get things moving faster.

When you get hired on a case, request discovery if that’s possible. Don’t wait for the first court date, or the second court date, or the third court date, to get an officer’s report. If that’s going to be the next thing that you need to make a decision, proactively reach out to the DA’s office, proactively reach out to the officer that’s involved in the case and get that discovery.

If you’re waiting on that for a decision about whether your case is going to be for plea or trial, you need that as soon as possible so that you can move to the next stage of the case. Figure out the next step in the process.

When you can play from ahead in the case, you can shorten the timeline of the case. You can shorten the case timeline. Again, if client hires you, they pay you a $1000 to handle their criminal matter, and you have to go to court one, two, three, four, five, six, seven times, over the course of a year, or they pay you a $1000 to handle their case criminal case and you’re able to resolve that case before the first court date, you’re getting paid the same amount of money.

You’re getting paid in lump sum the same amount of money, but you are not making the same amount of money on that case. You’re making a seventh of what you made on the other case, because you’re spending all those extra hours, all those extra trips going back and forth to the courthouse, all those extra phone calls for every pre-court call with the client.

And your client wants this problem resolved, they want this thing done. So you’re being less helpful on the case. If this is a client that wants this thing taken care of and you can get it done now, versus handling it three or four court dates down the road, get it done. Look at, proactively, ways that you can try to get your case’s timeline shorter.

How can you do it shorter? Do not sacrifice service and do not put anything at risk in terms of the client’s wellbeing. If it’s going to be helpful to the client to drag the case out, by all means drag the case out. If that’s a part of the strategy in terms of hopefully getting to a dismissal or a not guilty, do that. But if it’s out of laziness that the case is getting drag out, you’re costing yourself a ton of money, you’re costing yourself a ton of time, you’re costing yourself a ton of frustration. Don’t do it.

Finally, in terms of the playing from ahead mentality, one other place that you can look for, this is in the client communication. How can we play from ahead in client communication? Well, attorneys, it’s easy for us to play from ahead. We can blow this one out of the water. And the reason why, is that we are always playing from behind in client communication, and clients know that.

One of the main bar complaints that go to the bar is for poor client communication. My attorney won’t call me back, attorney won’t talk to me, my attorney won’t answer my calls.
Think if you paid somebody a $1000, basically for nothing. For their service, not because you got a car out of it, not because you got a computer, not because you got a vacation, but you paid a $1000 and said, “Here’s my problem. I need your help.” And then that person didn’t call you back.

They basically now become an additional problem for you. You had the original problem that you walked into the attorney’s office with and now you got a second problem. The second problem is that the person that you paid to help you with the problem is now a problem. So now you’ve got two problems as the client.

Clients are so used to that. That is such a thing that is known about attorneys, that we don’t call our clients back. That if you can be, not only responsive, that’s the baseline. Well, let’s just say this, if you can just be responsive to when a client calls, either answering the phone or calling them back within a timely fashion, you’re going to look like an amazing lawyer, if you can just respond. But we don’t want to offer just good service, which is what that would look like, we want to offer great service. Wow service.

What does wow service look like? That is where you are proactively reaching out to the client. “Hey, we just got this discovery back in the office today, we’re sending it to you for review. Please contact me so that we can set up a time to talk about it.” Not waiting until the client calls, not waiting until the next point in the communication, when there is something to be acted on, reaching out to the client. “Hey. We know that you have court coming up in two weeks. Doesn’t look like we’re going to be ready to go that day, do you mind if I reach out to the DA and try to get a continuance so that you don’t have to be present?”

Client will love that. They would love to not have to spend their morning in court. They would love to not have to lose time from their job because they are sitting in court on a case that they don’t even need to be there on because it’s just getting continued. They would love that. Proactive communication is the key to, or at least one of the keys, to playing from ahead when it comes to the client relationship, client communication. Provide answers proactively.

Again, in that consultation, when you’ve talked to the client, what you’re doing in terms of follow up? Are you sending them links to people that they can call to help them with the assessment to get the continuous alcohol monitor installed? Are you sending them information about who they should contact about insurance? Are you telling them what they need to do in terms of getting a limited driving privilege, both on the phone and in writing? Are you telling them with a couple of weeks ahead, when they can get their license back, what they need to do for that? How they’re going to pay the civil revocation fee?

Constantly providing information and reaching out to the client is playing from ahead. And that allows the client to feel like they are getting wow service because they are getting wow service, but it also, again, helps in terms of shortening that timeline and then not having to respond to fires.

If you fail to respond to clients, if client has to call two, three, four, five times, before they get in touch with you, they are going to tell your receptionist to go to hell. They are going to cause all kinds of problems on the phone with your team, they are going to feel terrible about how the relationship is going, they’re going to waste your staff’s time by complaining about the lack of response, and rightfully so, they should be doing that. So your team is going to spend time that it does not need to be spending, putting out this fire. Then you’re going to spend time doing the same thing.

When you don’t respond to client calling, when you finally talk to them, are they jumping straight into the problem that they were calling you about? Nope. They are first of all going to talk to you about how long it has taken for you to respond. They are going to talk to you about how long it has taken for you to answer their question and why has it taken this long. Why have you not called me back? And you’re going to spend 10 minutes just talking about the fact that… Explaining, apologizing, telling them you’ll do better in the future. And that’s all waste of time. If you just call them back, you’d avoid that.

But now when you’re on the proactive side of things, you’re saving even more time. It sounds like you’re going to spend more time by proactively reaching out to clients, you’re banking time when you proactively reach out to a client about the situation. If you can proactively reach out to your client and say, “Hey. In two weeks you have court, you need to bring $600 for the court cost. You have to have your assessment with you. We wanted to make sure that you know what you’re going to have to do in terms of community service. Bring your license with you.” If you do that phone call and they show up and they’re ready to go and everything is as it was said, you are going to have an easy case in the courtroom.

If they didn’t bring that because you never called them, now you’re going to have to ask for a continuance. You’re going to have to sit around and wait until the afternoon so that they can contact the assessor and see if they can fax it to your office or to the clerk’s office. You’re going to be running around printing things, you’re going to be making phone calls, you’re going to be calling the assessor. They could have done all of these things if you just told them what to do.

This whole podcast, it sounds kind of preachy, but let me tell you that I’m not perfect at this. This is something that I’m trying to innovate every day and get committed and disciplined every day about making sure that we are doing these things, because the client deserves this. This is not preachy thing, this is just what the client deserves.

Last way to get ahead. I think I already said this was the last way to get ahead, but truly last way to get ahead. The mindset that we have when it comes to our growth as an office. And this has been true since very early on, almost 10 years in at this point, this has been true since very early on, the way that we see a client when they come into the office, is that every client that comes into the office today is 10 clients down the road. Every client that comes into the office today because of the service that we know we can provide to them, now, today, is going to result in 10 more clients down the road because of the word of mouth. Positive spread. It’s going to be a exponential growth from every client that walks into the office today. That’s how you play from ahead.

That’s how you play from ahead in businesses. Thinking through how can we create a client that when they walk out of this door after we’ve closed their case, that they are ready in the future to send 10 more clients our way. How you do that, is by providing wow service. Providing wow service allows you to play from ahead, and please not play from behind in terms of now having to, with every client that leaves your office, you got to worry about them leaving you a negative nasty review. You got to worry about them telling all their friends, “Hey. If you ever get in trouble, definitely don’t call this guy,” because you will go out of business in this world of reviews if that’s how people feel when they leave your office.

So you can’t really have that attitude, but if you just provide good service, your client will be satisfied, they’ll feel like their money was well spent, they will leave your office and they will never talk about you again. So good is not good enough. You’ve got to provide great wow service so that every client that walks into your office today results in 10 more in the future. That’s the value of playing from ahead. I hope you all play from ahead. Look forward to talking with you next time.

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NC DWI Guy Episode 26: Crush Q4 2020 https://www.minicklaw.com/nc-dwi-guy-episode-26-crush-q4-2020/ Wed, 14 Oct 2020 12:48:22 +0000 https://www.minicklaw.com/?p=212894 Don’t waste Q4! There is still time (90 days) to make Q4 a year that you can label as a “win” for your practice.

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With the uncertainty and stress caused by COVID in the legal industry, many district court criminal defense attorneys are ready to speed through the last three months of quarter 4 of 2020. Don’t waste Q4! There is still time (90 days) to make Q4 a year that you can label as a “win” for your practice. In business, as in football, whoever is in the lead at the end of the fourth quarter wins the game. If 2020 has been a good year for your practice, don’t let your foot off the gas. If 2020 has been a source of nothing but stress and frustration, make sure you crush this final leg of the year.

Highlights:

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Learn why the key to goal setting is in specificity and deadlines

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Get a pep talk on closing out 2020 with a bang

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Understand the critical importance of telling others (your team, your spouse, your friends, your family, etc.) about your goals for accountability purposes

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Don’t set goals that are interesting, set goals that you are committed to accomplishing

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NC DWI Guy Episode #25: NC DWI v. SC DUI with Christopher Brough https://www.minicklaw.com/nc-dwi-guy-episode-25-nc-dwi-v-sc-dui-christopher-brough/ Wed, 07 Oct 2020 13:04:20 +0000 https://www.minicklaw.com/?p=212887 In this episode, Jake Minick discusses some of the differences between NC DWI and SC DUI with SC attorney Christopher Brough.

The post NC DWI Guy Episode #25: NC DWI v. SC DUI with Christopher Brough appeared first on Minick Law, P.C..

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In today’s episode Jake Minick discusses some of the differences between NC Driving While Impaired and SC Driving Under Influence with SC attorney Christopher Brough. Chris is a member of the National College for DUI Defense and opened his own practice in 2005 which is located in Spartanburg, SC.

Highlights:

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Discover how a DUI case is processed in SC through the SC magistrates courts and circuit courts.

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Learn about the importance of video evidence in SC DUI cases including recording of SFSTs, Miranda warnings, and breath testing procedures.

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Find out the license impact for a NC resident of a SC DUI conviction.

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Learn about the impact of refusing chemical testing in SC in terms of both courtroom and license consequences.

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NC DWI Guy Episode #24: NC Alcohol Assessment Unveiled with Megan and Scott Thomas https://www.minicklaw.com/nc-dwi-guy-episode-24-nc-alcohol-assessment-unveiled-with-megan-and-scott-thomas/ Fri, 02 Oct 2020 14:00:49 +0000 https://www.minicklaw.com/?p=212880 In today’s episode Jake Minick talks with Megan and Scott Thomas who own and run Silver Lining Therapy in Asheville, NC.

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In today’s episode Jake Minick talks with Megan and Scott Thomas who own and run Silver Lining Therapy in Asheville, NC. Megan and Scott provide a full range of addiction and behavioral help services, including alcohol assessments, ADETS (a.k.a. Prime for Life), and short-term and long-term recovery treatment. On today’s episode Megan and Scott allow us to see behind the curtain of the alcohol assessment and give an overview of ADETS.

Highlights:

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Understand what factors go into the recommended hours of treatment during a DWI alcohol assessment

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Discover the intake and evaluation process of the initial assessment, including the types of questions your client will be asked during the assessment

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Discovery tips and tricks for using the assessment and the recommended treatment in sentencing and how you can help your client maximize the treatment process and the impact it can have on your client’s personal life

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Gain insight into the purpose and structure of ADETS (a.k.a. Prime for Life Course)

The post NC DWI Guy Episode #24: NC Alcohol Assessment Unveiled with Megan and Scott Thomas appeared first on Minick Law, P.C..

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NC DWI Guy Episode #23: Motion to Dismiss Based on State v. Eldred and State v. Kraft https://www.minicklaw.com/nc-dwi-guy-23-motion-dismiss-based-state-v-eldred-state-v-kraft/ Wed, 23 Sep 2020 13:29:10 +0000 https://www.minicklaw.com/?p=212851 In today’s Episode we examine the recent Court of Appeals cases of State v. Kraft and State v. Eldred, both decided in 2018.

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In today’s Episode we examine the recent Court of Appeals cases of State v. Kraft and State v. Eldred, both decided in 2018. These decisions are dynamite cases for the defense and every attorney in NC that regularly handles DWI cases should be intimately familiar with these cases. In this episode get an overview of the procedural and substantive value of these two opinions.

Highlights:

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Why it is important in a Motion to Dismiss based on Kraft or Eldred to hammer the standard of review for at the close of the State’s evidence

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Examination of the facts in Kraft (focusing on driving) and Eldred (timing of consumption of impairing substance) and how to compare these facts with those of your client

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We look at the high standard that the court sets when it comes to circumstantial evidence of either driving or the timing of alcohol consumption and how to argue the court this high burden

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Learn how to refocus the argument you make during a Motion to Dismiss based on Kraft/Eldred during your final closing argument at the conclusion of a trial

Transcript:

 

‘”One hundred feet of tire impressions veer off a highway, past the scuffed boulder, and end at a damaged unoccupied vehicle whose registered owner is found walking along the same highway disoriented and unsteady on his feet. He admits that he has smoked up on meth and that he wrecked the vehicle a couple of hours earlier. Most anyone would surmise what happened and might very well be right. But because the law prohibits imposing criminal liability based on conjecture, gaps in the evidence and controlling precedent require that we reverse defendant’s conviction for driving while impaired.”

And that is the opening paragraph of a recent Court of Appeals decision, State v. Eldred, a case decided by the Court of Appeals in 2018, 815 S.E.2d, 742.

That case is a case that is extremely helpful in a situation where you have a client that is involved in an accident and the State cannot definitively show when the person, when your client was consuming alcohol or any other drugs. So either they don’t have an admission, didn’t observe any drinking. Basically, there is just pure conjecture as to when the person actually consumed alcohol.

So today, we are going to talk about State v. Kraft and State v. Eldred, two recent cases, both decided in 2018, that are extremely powerful defense cases. A couple of reasons why they are extremely powerful for the defense, but number one, and primarily, they overturn a defendant’s conviction for driving while impaired. So they end up being decided in favor of the defendant.

But more importantly is the focal point of when the Court of Appeals says that the trial court erred. And what the Court of Appeals says in both of these cases, State v. Eldred and State v. Kraft, is that based on the evidence in those cases, the trial court should have granted the defendant’s motion to dismiss at the close of the State’s evidence.

So these are extremely powerful cases because of the procedural timeframe of when the Court of Appeals says that the trial court went wrong.

When you look at a motion to dismiss at the close of the State’s evidence, so the State has put up its witnesses, has presented whatever exhibits and video that they want to present, and the State rests, the defense should always make a motion to dismiss. Whether you want to be heard on that motion or not, you should always make a motion to dismiss at the close of State’s evidence.

The Court of Appeals pointed to the fact that when you’re looking at a motion to dismiss, the evidence should be viewed in the light most favorable to the State, giving the State the benefit of all reasonable inferences. Viewed in the light most favorable to the State, giving the State the benefit of all reasonable inferences. Contradictions in the evidence do not warrant dismissal and are for the jury to resolve. So if you have contradictions at the close of the State’s evidence, that’s not sufficient to grant a motion to dismiss.

When ruling on a motion to dismiss, the trial court should be concerned only about whether the evidence is sufficient for jury consideration, not about the weight of the evidence. So setting up that overview and pointing… If you have a case where an Eldred or a Kraft issue is up for grabs, make sure that you first of all make your argument at the close of the State’s evidence following your oral motion to dismiss. I’m assuming that we’re in District Court at this time in terms of most of where these type of arguments happen.

So at the close of the State’s evidence, you make your motion to dismiss, and then begin by setting out the framework for a judge to consider a motion to dismiss at the close of the State’s evidence, looking at all of the evidence in the light most favorable to the State and giving the State the benefit of all reasonable inferences.

Now, why do you want to point that out? It’s like, whoa, that’s for the prosecutor to say that. We don’t want to give them more ammunition than they need. We don’t want to tell the judge not to grant our motion to dismiss. In this particular context, you want to emphasize that standard.

And the reason why is that there is decent circumstantial evidence of driving while impaired in both Eldred and Kraft, and the Court of Appeals said in both cases, “Not enough.” Even when we look at the evidence in the light most favorable to the State, the State can’t make a claim.

This is important for two reasons. One, in terms of setting up the motion to dismiss and the procedural standard of review at the end of the State’s evidence, this is important first of all because you want the judge to grant your motion to dismiss at the close of the State’s evidence.

But, more importantly, it’s really important to emphasize the procedural standard because then you can re-argue your Kraft or Eldred issues at the end of all of the evidence, but at that point, looking at it through the lens of beyond a reasonable doubt.

So you can say, “Judge, again, pointing you back to Kraft, which we had discussed during our motion to dismiss, in that case, the court was looking at the evidence through the light most favorable to the State. They were giving the State every benefit of the doubt. Now, the procedural framework is reversed. The standard of proof is reversed, and its every piece of evidence should be looked at with the benefit of the doubt being given to my client. Every piece of evidence should be looked at with scrutiny when it comes to what the State has said.”

So, again, if you can set up the framework of even when looking at the case in the light most favorable to the State under Kraft and Eldred, the court found not enough, if the judge doesn’t grant your motion to dismiss at the close of the State’s evidence, you can now flip the script and say, “Again, Judge, in these cases, it wasn’t even enough to survive a motion to dismiss with all of the inferences being given to the State.” So it’s really important in your motion to dismiss to argue that procedural standard by which the Court of Appeals in Kraft and Eldred in 2018 was looking at the evidence.

So first of all, looking at Kraft, again, the opening lines that I started the podcast out with are the opening lines of Eldred and Kraft, in Eldred, officers came upon a accident scene. They observed a hundred feet of tire impressions on the grass leading from the highway to the stopped vehicle. No person found on scene. Nobody found on scene. They start searching for whoever it might be that was driving the vehicle. And about two to three miles up Highway 221, they find the defendant. They find Mr. Eldred. And what they were looking for was pretty much anybody because they didn’t come upon any other person. So they find Mr. Eldred who has signs on his forehead of a recent cut. They observed that he was twitching and seemed unsteady on his feet. They asked what he was doing. And he said, “I don’t know. I’m too smoked up on meth.” They placed him in handcuffs and began their further investigation.

Later, defendant admitted that he was driving. The police never found anybody else on scene near the vehicle. They didn’t find anybody else walking along the highway. They found nobody else on scene. They didn’t observe at the time of first observing Mr. Eldred that he was smoking anything. They didn’t find anything that would indicate on his person recent meth use. They didn’t ask when he had last consumed meth. And that is the focal point that the court looked at was the lack of timeframe of when meth had been consumed.

Again, they come upon a serious accident. Nobody’s on scene. They find somebody down the roadway just a couple of miles away that indicates that they were driving, indicates that they’re smoked up on meth. But the record is silent, the testimony was silent about when defendant had last consumed drugs.

If you have a case where your record, where your evidence, your discovery is silent as to whether or not there has been any alcohol or other impairing substances consumed post-accident, or your client specifically states that they have consumed alcohol or an impairing substance post-accident, you have a Eldred issue.

This is worth consideration in terms of arguing this particular case because that’s what the court ultimately zeroed in on was that lack of evidence. The court after looking at this and, again, they had evidence that this person was driving because he admitted to driving. They had evidence of a bad accident, injuries to the individual that indicated he was driving. They have very serious statements from the defendant that he’s too smoked up on meth, signs and indicators of impairment. They don’t find anything on him indicating that he was smoking meth at the time that they come upon him. And there’s just no questions asked about the timing of consumption.

So what the court says is that a reasonable person, most anyone would surmise what happened and might very well be right is what the court says. Most anyone would surmise what happened. A reasonable person could look at this evidence and say, “That person was smoked up on meth at the time of driving.” But that’s not enough when it comes to a criminal case.

And not only is it not enough to get to beyond a reasonable doubt, the court in Eldred says, “This isn’t even enough when looking at all of this evidence in the light most favorable tothe State to survive a motion to dismiss at the close of the State’s evidence.” The court in summarizing why it believed a motion to dismiss should have been granted by the trial court indicates the gaps in the evidence in this case are analogous to those in State v. Ray, a 1981 Court of Appeals case.

The court in Eldred indicates in Ray a law enforcement officer found the defendant who was intoxicated alone in a disabled vehicle halfway in the front seat. The court held that the trial court erred in denying the defendant’s motion to dismiss a driving while impaired charge because the circumstantial evidence alone is insufficient to support a conclusion that the defendant was the driver. Clearly, this accident situation when the officers don’t come upon a vehicle where the defendant is still in the driver’s seat with the keys in the ignition, it’s circumstantial evidence. Circumstantial evidence in Ray. Circumstantial evidence in Eldred.

The Eldred Court went on to say, “This court noted that the State presented no evidence,” again, pointing back to Ray, “that the car had been operated recently or that it was in motion at the time the officer observed the defendant, nor did the State offer evidence that the motor vehicle was running with the defendant sitting under the steering wheel at the time the officer came upon the scene.”

These cases point to the fact that circumstantial evidence of driving and the timing of impairment has to be extremely strong, extremely strong. When you don’t have direct evidence of the timeframe of impairment, the circumstantial evidence better be extremely strong because even where it is the evidence that’s presented in Eldred and looking at it in the light most favorable to the State, that didn’t cut it. That didn’t get you there.

So where you have a case where there is a gap between driving and when officers get involved and the officers by circumstantial evidence alone can say that the person was impaired at the time of driving, so they don’t have an admission from the defendant of consumption of impairing substance only prior to driving, then you have this Eldred issue. And the circumstantial evidence according to Ray and according to State v. Eldred has to be pretty strong because the facts in Eldred are pretty good circumstantial evidence of impairment at the time of driving, and the court says, “Not enough.” Not enough to survive a motion to dismiss.

Another case from 2018 that focuses I would say more on the driving element than on the timeframe of impairment. So Eldred is a case that focuses primarily on the timing of impairment. So you have an accident. Driving isn’t necessarily an issue, but the timeframe of impairment is. Kraft focuses more on the driving elements being the thing that the court is going to focus in on. So in Kraft, the troopers respond to a accident. When they come upon the accident scene, they find a woman holding the defendant’s head as he snored.

A motorcycle was on the ground about 10 feet away. The trooper flashes his light into defendant’s face. And upon waking up, the defendant starts cursing and yelling. The trooper can smell a strong odor of alcoholic beverage coming from the defendant and notices that the defendant is sweating. The defendant has scrapes and bruises on his body, and his clothes are ripped. The trooper stated that the defendant’s condition made it appear to him that he was just recently involved in a motorcycle crash.

Trooper does roadside investigation. Does not find anybody else on scene that would indicate, that either admitted to being involved or that they could find was involved in the accident. They walk up and down the highway looking for anybody else that might be involved, and they can’t find anybody else up and down the highway. And after the defendant is transported by ambulance, they do an HGN test. After the defendant is transported by ambulance to the hospital, they follow up at the hospital with the defendant and briefly talk to him about the situation.

There’s no admission of driving. There’s no admission of driving. The record is silent as to the driving element. Again, just like in the Eldred case, most anyone who came upon that accident scene of a motorcycle single vehicle accident, finding a person that is knocked out on the side of the road 10 feet away from the motorcycle with nobody else on scene having injuries or admitting to driving, most people would think to themselves that dude was the dude that was driving. And it’s pretty clear from the fact that there’s an accident, this guy is the only one around, there’s no trail of blood to follow anybody else. We looked up and down the highway. We couldn’t find anybody else. Seems like this guy was the person driving.

And you might be right if you assume that.

But like in Eldred, the court pointed out that in a criminal case, this circumstantial evidence of driving was not enough, not enough to survive a motion to dismiss. So the court summarizes in State v. Kraft by this.

“Here, viewed in the light most favorable to the State, the State presented evidence that the defendant was found lying about 10 feet away from the motorcycle. As in Ray, Trooper Mastromonica noticed an odor of alcohol about defendant, and defendant had scratches and torn clothes that would suggest defendant was involved in an accident. However, the State presented no evidence suggesting that defendant had been driving the motorcycle rather than a passenger. There was no testimony that defendant was seen driving the motorcycle or even sitting on it. And there was no evidence that the keys were ever found or that defendant implicated himself. A defendant’s mere presence at the scene, as well as the fact that a defendant may have consumed alcohol, is insufficient to tend to show that he was the driver. Although the State established that defendant was the owner of the motorcycle, this information, even when combined with all the other evidence presented by the State, merely rose to a level of ‘suspicion or conjecture that defendant was driver of the motorcycle involved in the accident.”

That is some powerful language. If you are looking for some defense-friendly case law, State v. Kraft and State v. Eldred are where it’s at.

That is powerful language. Conjecture is not enough. Suspicion is not enough, not enough to survive a motion to dismiss at the close of the State’s evidence, and certainly not enough to rise to the level of proof beyond a reasonable doubt that is required in a criminal case.

So, again, from these cases, State v. Kraft and State v. Eldred, in summary, always talk about the standard that a judge is viewing these arguments through at the close of the State’s evidence, in the light most favorable to the State with all reasonable inferences in the State’s direction.

Then compare your case to State v. Eldred if you have a case that really is about the timing of consumption of an impairing substance, or State v. Kraft if you have a driving issue and the State is going to have a difficult time proving driving, or both if both issues exist. Argue those at the close of the State’s evidence in your motion to dismiss.

And then if the judge denies your motion to dismiss, make sure you re-argue at the close of all the evidence. But at that point, really pound the fact that the lens now is proof beyond a reasonable doubt. That’s not the lens that Kraft and Eldred looked at when they said there wasn’t enough circumstantial evidence. So how much more circumstantial evidence would be required in order to get to a conviction? Really, it’d be difficult to kind of think of a situation absent a defendant’s admission of drinking only prior to driving or of driving if you have a Kraft situation. Really, it’d be one of those situations where the State could then still obtain a conviction.

Circumstantial evidence would have to be ridiculously strong to not only survive a motion to dismiss, but for a judge to find your client guilty of driving while impaired at the close of all the evidence.

Hope this podcast has been helpful. Read State v. Kraft. Read State v. Eldred. Read State v. Ray. And I look forward to speaking with you again next time.

The post NC DWI Guy Episode #23: Motion to Dismiss Based on State v. Eldred and State v. Kraft appeared first on Minick Law, P.C..

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NC DWI Guy Episode #22: NC Limited Privilege for Out-of-State or Federal DWI Conviction https://www.minicklaw.com/nc-dwi-guy-22-nc-limited-privilege-out-of-state-federal-dwi-conviction/ Wed, 16 Sep 2020 12:23:08 +0000 https://www.minicklaw.com/?p=212834 James Minick walks you through the process of filing a limited driving privilege for a DWI conviction that happened in another state or on federal land.

The post NC DWI Guy Episode #22: NC Limited Privilege for Out-of-State or Federal DWI Conviction appeared first on Minick Law, P.C..

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What do you do when you get a client that calls in who is a North Carolina resident that just got a nasty-gram from the DMV informing him that his license is going to be suspended for an out-of-state or federal conviction? James Minick walks you through the process of filing a limited driving privilege for a DWI conviction that happened in another state or on federal land.

Highlights:

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Learn how a driving record is your answer key to identifying revocations and how to address them
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Find out where to file an out-of-state privilege and which judge will need to sign the privilege
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Identify the court costs associated with an out-of-state privilege

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NC DWI Guy Episode #21: The Importance of an Annual Marketing Retreat https://www.minicklaw.com/nc-dwi-guy-21-importance-annual-marketing-retreat/ Wed, 09 Sep 2020 12:24:34 +0000 https://www.minicklaw.com/?p=212827 Get some practical tips from the NC DWI Guy on how to run an effective marketing retreat whether you are a solo or for your team.

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“Wanna Get Away?” is the famous Southwest Airlines advertisement. In contrast to this mantra, today we talk about the importance of proactively planning to get away in order to work on your business instead of in it. Get some practical tips on how to run an effective marketing retreat whether you are a solo or for your team.

Highlights:

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Understand the value of holding an annual marketing retreat

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Learn why an annual marketing retreat is best conducted offsite

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Learn how to best plan your annual retreat and why effective planning is critical to maximizing your time during the retreat

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Challenge to solo practitioners: carve out the time to make an annual retreat. Don’t wait to make this happen!

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What Color To Wear To Court https://www.minicklaw.com/what-color-to-wear-to-court/ Mon, 07 Sep 2020 18:14:49 +0000 https://www.minicklaw.com/?p=8510 The post What Color To Wear To Court appeared first on Minick Law, P.C..

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While the color of the outfit you have decided to wear to your court hearing is probably that furthest thing from your mind as you prepare to appear in court, it is nevertheless highly important.

Books have been written on the subtle cues color and appearance can have on the judge and jury in the courtroom, so dressing well is a proven factor in court appearances.

What Color Should a Woman Wear to Court?

Darker, more serious colors are preferable, and bright colors should be avoided. The best colors to wear to court are “conservative” colors (white, blue, navy, gray, and the like) and to steer clear of crazy patterns and shocking fashion statements.

Rule number one for women in the courtroom is: Don’t dress to distract.

You can wear either a pantsuit, dress, or a skirt and nice top, but any skirt or dress should be almost at the knee. Avoid clothes that are too tight or too revealing, as this can make the judge and jurors think that you are not taking the court proceedings seriously.

Another important rule to keep in mind when appearing in court: Don’t undermine your case. If you are going before the court because of a financial matter, then it is advisable not to wear expensive jewelry, designer shoes, and lots of makeup. While you may be used to wearing such things in your personal life, it will not help you in court.

A similar color scheme should be adopted by both men and women in the courtroom.

Color Tips for Men

Wear a suit. Although you may be tempted to wear jeans to court, there is no better option for men to wear to court than a professional looking business suit. This is the only option if you want to show the judge respect for him or her and the court proceedings as well.

But is there a specific color suit which is better than the others?

As silly as it may seem, there is. The darker the suit, the better. Light colored suits (such as blue, light gray, tan, maroon, green, or other colors) are not viewed as formal, so it is best to avoid them. Black is another color to avoid, however, because it often can seem imposing and authoritative – and when you are the defendant, you want to appear humble and serious, not in charge.

The best colors to wear are dark gray and navy blue. Stop by a second hand shop if you do not own a suit, you can find one very inexpensively.  For a more in depth explanation of the reasons behind optimal color choice, watch the following video:

Following the same guidelines outlined in this video, it is important to choose your other clothing carefully as well.

Wear a dress shirt, but one of a basic color (blue or white). Your tie should also be a color that is not bold or bright or sharp (no red, orange, or other bright colors – blue or black is preferred).

Wear a belt to hold your suit pants up, and wear polished dress shoes too (either black or brown). You may feel uncomfortable dressing up, but going to court is a big deal – you should look the part.

Other Important Factors

While color is definitely a factor in a favorable courtroom appearance, there are other factors to keep in mind for your day in court. It is important to know how to respectfully and favorably talk to a judge, as well as how to behave in court in general. See our blog for our 11 Tips For Your First Court Appearance.

Overall, a good first impression is critical in the outcome of your court proceeding, so taking the time to do everything right before you step into the courtroom is critical to your success in court.

Speak to your attorney if you have any other questions about how to prepare for your day in court.

See the Courtroom Etiquette series on our blog for more information on how to dress for court.

Take a look at our infographic on What to Wear and How to Behave in court!

What should I wear in court, how should I behave

Share this Image On Your Site

 

Contact Us

If you would like to discuss courtroom protocol or have an attorney help answer your questions about your court appearance, contact our office now.

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Psychedelic Mushrooms in NC – Elements and Punishments https://www.minicklaw.com/psychedelic-mushrooms-in-nc/ https://www.minicklaw.com/psychedelic-mushrooms-in-nc/#comments Mon, 07 Sep 2020 11:29:03 +0000 https://www.minicklaw.com/?p=1251 In North Carolina, Psilocybin, the active psychedelic ingredient in hallucinogenic mushrooms is classified as a Schedule I Controlled Substance under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-89(3)(r). There are various crimes that an individual can be charged with regarding the drug of hallucinogenic mushrooms. The crimes listed below are the most common psychedelic mushroom charges that we can […]

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DWI/Criminal Attorney Blake Marcus

DWI/Criminal Attorney Blake Marcus

In North Carolina, Psilocybin, the active psychedelic ingredient in hallucinogenic mushrooms is classified as a Schedule I Controlled Substance under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-89(3)(r). There are various crimes that an individual can be charged with regarding the drug of hallucinogenic mushrooms. The crimes listed below are the most common psychedelic mushroom charges that we can help our clients with in NC. Each crime lists the required elements that the State must prove beyond a reasonable doubt and the punishments for conviction of the crime.

Possession of Hallucinogenic Mushrooms

Elements

A person is guilty of this offense under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-95(a)(3) if they:

  1. Knowingly
  2. Possess (this element does not require that Hallucinogenic Mushrooms be found on the person charged so long as the person can be seen to have control over the area where the Hallucinogenic Mushrooms are found)
  3. Hallucinogenic Mushrooms

Punishment

The possession of Hallucinogenic Mushrooms in North Carolina is considered a Class I felony under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-95(d)(1).

Sale or Delivery of Hallucinogenic Mushrooms

Elements

A person is guilty of this offense under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-95(b)(1) if they:

  1. Knowingly
  2. Sell or deliver (actual or constructive transfer to another)
  3. Hallucinogenic Mushrooms
  4. To another

Punishments

The sale of Hallucinogenic Mushrooms in North Carolina is considered a Class G Felony under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-95(b)(1). The delivery of Hallucinogenic Mushrooms in North Carolina is considered a Class H Felony under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-95(b)(1).

Manufacturing of Hallucinogenic Mushrooms

Elements

A person is guilty of this offense under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-95(a)(1) if they:

  1. Knowingly
  2. Manufacture (producing, preparing, processing, packaging, or labeling)
  3. Hallucinogenic Mushrooms

Punishment

The manufacturing of Hallucinogenic Mushrooms in North Carolina is considered a Class I felony under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-95(b)(1).

Possession of Hallucinogenic Mushrooms with Intent to Manufacture, Sell, or Deliver

Elements

A person is guilty of this offense under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-95(a)(1) if they:

  1. Knowingly
  2. Possess
  3. Hallucinogenic Mushrooms
  4. With the intent to manufacture, sell, or deliver it

Punishment

Possession of Hallucinogenic Mushrooms with intent to manufacture, sell, or deliver is considered a Class H felony under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-95(b)(1).

Possession of Drug Paraphernalia

Elements

A person is guilty of this offense under N.C. Gen. Stat. § 90-113.22 if they:

  1. Knowingly
  2. Uses or possesses with intent to use
  3. Drug paraphernalia
  4. For any of the following purposes
    1. To plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, or harvest; or
    2. To manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process or prepare; or
    3. To test or analyze; or
    4. To package, repackage, store contain, or conceal; or
    5. To inject, ingest, inhale, or otherwise introduce into the body;
  5. Hallucinogenic Mushrooms

Punishment

The punishment for possession of drug paraphernalia in North Carolina is a Class I misdemeanor under N.C. Gen. Stat. 90-95(e)(3).

Contact us today at Minick Law to set up a FREE initial consultation on your criminal case.

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What Happens If You’re Late to Court (And What to Do If You Will Be) https://www.minicklaw.com/what-happens-if-late-to-court/ Thu, 03 Sep 2020 16:32:04 +0000 https://www.minicklaw.com/?p=8840 One of the surest ways to lose the respect of the judge and courtroom, and to show disrespect to the court proceedings is to be late to your court date.

The post What Happens If You’re Late to Court (And What to Do If You Will Be) appeared first on Minick Law, P.C..

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What exactly happens if you’re late to court? One of the surest ways to lose the respect of the judge and courtroom, and to show disrespect to the court proceedings is to be late to your court date. Court etiquette demands that you show up on time.

Whether your court hearing is for a large crime or a minor traffic violation, judges demand that you take it seriously. You can show respect in a variety of ways, including the way you’re dressed and the way you behave, but nothing can show disrespect more easily than coming into the courtroom late.

Make sure you show up on time, prepared, and with enough time to get yourself situated in the courtroom.

If You’re Out of Town

If you receive your court summons and notice that it is scheduled for a day when you will be out of town, then it is perfectly acceptable to call the clerk’s office and ask them to reschedule your court date. Court dates are issued based on the date of the offense and the date the case is filed, so there is a range of days during which you can be called into court.

If you are unable to show up to court, and the clerk is unable to reschedule, then for some cases you have the ability to hire an attorney to show up to court for you, and can handle your case without you being present.

Do not wait until the last minute to reschedule your court date or hire a lawyer to represent you at your court date if you are unable to make it. Call as soon as possible to schedule a new court date.

Can You Walk into Court Late?

If you find yourself running late on the way to your court date, do not avoid the court date. Even if you are late, not to show up will lead to the judge charging you with failure to appear and issuing a warrant for your arrest.

Try to contact the clerk on the phone while you’re en route if you know you will be late, so that at least they know you are coming. When you arrive, expect to be sternly reminded that you are severely at fault for not being on time. Own up to the fact that you were late, and there shouldn’t be any problems after that.

Conclusion

A court date, no matter how light of a charge, is nothing to play around with. Leave early, leave extra early to get there on time, and make sure everything you do shows that you are showing the utmost respect for the court and the proceedings.

Contact Us

If you or someone you know has been charged with a crime, it is important to consult with an experienced criminal defense attorney that can help zealously defend your case. Contact us at Minick Law, P.C. for a free consultation on your case.

Related Articles:

How Should I Behave In Court?

Courtroom Etiquette: What Should I Wear to Court & How Should I Behave?

Can You Wear Jeans to Court?

 

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